The most important class, however, for me and for hundreds of other Hungarian musicians, was the chamber-music class. From about the age of fourteen, and until graduation from the Academy, all instrumentalists except the heavy-brass players and percussionists had to participate in this course. Presiding over it for many years was the composer Leó Weiner, who thus exercised an enormous influence on three generations of Hungarian musicians.

Sir Georg Solti
MÁV Symphony Orchestra

12 November 2020, 19.00-21.30

Grand Hall

MÁV Symphony Orchestra

Streamed only

Beethoven: Fidelio – Overture
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58
Beethoven: Symphony No. 2 in D major, Op. 36

Dezső Ránki (piano)
MÁV Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Imre Kollár

As the 250th anniversary of the birth of Beethoven approaches, there are even more concerts of his music. Naturally, he needs no commemoration since he is the composer whose works are played most often around the world. Our concert gives a modest cross-section of his symphonic art. The overture from Fidelio, his only opera, introduces the piece in a way that anticipates the milieu of the first act. Many hold the view that, of his five piano concertos, the fourth is the most exciting and unique, and a pattern that was still being followed a hundred years later, for instance by Béla Bartók. The orchestra have already played this work with Dezső Ránki on several occasions; his profound technique perfectly revealing the majesty of the composition remains fresh in the memory. After the first symphony that follows Haydn’s traditions, the second shows unmistakeable, inimitable traits of pure Beethoven. It serves as a worthy forerunner to the Eroica symphony. The orchestra are looking forward to this latest meeting with their former principal conductor, Imre Kollár.

Presented by

MÁV Symphony Orchestra

Tickets:

HUF 4 500, 5 000, 5 500