The most important class, however, for me and for hundreds of other Hungarian musicians, was the chamber-music class. From about the age of fourteen, and until graduation from the Academy, all instrumentalists except the heavy-brass players and percussionists had to participate in this course. Presiding over it for many years was the composer Leó Weiner, who thus exercised an enormous influence on three generations of Hungarian musicians.

Sir Georg Solti
Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra

21 May 2020, 19.30-22.00

Grand Hall

Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra

Choral Fantasy

Cancelled

Bernstein: Chichester Psalms
Beethoven: Choral Fantasy, Op. 80
INTERMISSION
Beethoven: Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68 (‘Pastorale’)

Péter Frankl (piano)
Hungarian National Choir (choirmaster: Csaba Somos)
Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra
Conductor: Nimrod David Pfeffer

On 22 December 1808, the public gathered in the Theater an der Wien to hear new works by Beethoven. The programme was a success, albeit a slightly exhausting one, since it lasted four solid hours. It included two new symphonies (C minor and F major), the Piano Concerto in G major, a concert aria, two mass movements and the composer improvized in front of the public, too, indeed, at the last moment he decided to write an upliing choral work as a finale. This latter was the Choral Fantasy. The hall was unheated and it is said that Beethoven was amused that the majority of the audience stayed the course from beginning to end. Now we have the chance to hear the Choral Fantasy and Symphony No. 6 without shivering at all. The peculiarity of the former is the lengthy piano introduction (originally, Beethoven improvised this at the concert) as well as the melody that bears a striking resemblance to the later Ode to Joy. Beethoven wrote short descriptions to movements of the Pastorale Symphony in F major. The first is about the beauties of rural life, the second is a scene by the brook. Then a merry village feast gets underway, only to be interrupted by nature’s own particular celebration – thunder and storm. The conclusion is a hymn of thanks to nature. These Beethoven works are preceded by the opening work, a three-movement, popular piece by Leonard Bernstein, Chichester Psalms, composed for the festival of the famous cathedral in England.

 

 

Presented by

Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra

Tickets:

HUF 3 500, 4 000, 4 500, 5 500